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Guyana: “Unemployment drops marginally”

First continuous quarterly labour survey finds

THE first-ever local continuous quarterly Labour Force Survey (LFS) has recorded a marginal decrease in the unemployment level, which moved from 12.5 per cent in 2012 to 12.0 per cent in the third quarter of 2017.

The LFS is one of the main tools used to track labour market dynamics such as unemployment, job creation, and job destruction, said officials who spoke at the launch of the first bulletin of the survey at the Marriott Hotel on Thursday.
Deputy Chief Statistician of the Bureau of Statistics, Ian Manifold, said the report summarises the main findings and indicators from the first quarter of the Guyana LFS which was the third quarter of 2017 (July to September).

“Whenever possible, it also compares them with the indicators referring to the 2012 Census and published in the related compendia,” said Manifold.
He said the LFS is meant to provide a quick and complete snapshot of the labour market for policy makers within the public and private sectors, as well as general stakeholders.
The bulletin was prepared by Diego Rei, Employment and Labour Market Specialist International Labour Organisation (ILO) Decent Work Team and Office for the Caribbean, in collaboration with Manifold and the Bureau. It benefitted from technical support and inputs from Diether Wolfgang Beuermann Mendoza, Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), Yves Perardel, ILO Statistics Department, and Ramiro Flores Cruz, Sistemas Integrales.
It includes approximately 4,000 households every quarter, resulting in a total of about 15,000 individuals out of which about 11,000 are 15 years old or above.

“LFS is one of the main tools used to track labour market dynamics such as unemployment, job creation, and job destruction. However, up to July 2017, no such survey was regularly conducted in Guyana. This reality hindered the possibility of having up-to-date, objective information to inform evidence-based policy decisions,” said the deputy chief statistician.

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